Sunday, October 23, 2005

Alison Pace, If Andy Warhol Had A Girlfriend

If Andy wasn't dead- and gay- well, he would just love Alison Pace.



The book takes place in the art world.

Andy Warhol would have loved partying with Alison at Studio 54 along with his pals Halston and Liza Minelli.


I knew from the moment the book was in my hands that I would love it. And I did enjoy the book quite a lot and especially liked the backdrop of the art world in the novel. Embarrassing, yes- but I developed a bit of a crush on the character of Ian.

I never knew Andy Warhol had so many quote worthy quips, you're going to have to read the book to see what I'm talking about. Alison has a really fun blog, which you can see here. Her website can be viewed by clicking this link. And I know Ethan Hawke is a huge fan of this site, so Ethan, would you please contact Alison for date? Just be sure to wear a bib. You'll have to read Alison's blog entry to see her real life sighting of Mr. Hawke.

If Andy indeed had a girlfriend, what would she be like?

Two answers for this one.

1. I think she'd be very fabulous and exactly like you, Distressed Jeans. (thanks Alison!)

2. I think, pretty much, there are not many circumstances in which Andy Warhol would have had a girlfriend.

If you could host a dinner party with anyone past or present, who would you chose to sit at your table?

Oh, tough question. Let's see: You'd be there of course, and hopefully Andy Warhol, Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert, and then Ed Helms would be my date. Jane Austen; Philip Roth; Ann Brashares (I love her books); My editor, she's very lovely; Ellen DeGeneres; Willie Nelson; Lyle Lovett; Tom Cruise and Katie so he could yell at everybody and we could observe the TomKat dynamic; Plato liked a good dinner party, didn't he? And then of course as soon as the invitations went out, I'd think I could have done a better job with it all, and would want to do it again, differently.

Liza Minelli or Barry Manilow? And would you wear a concert tee shirt in public?

Barry Manilow, hands down. I sometimes enjoy wearing my Super Diamond tee shirt, but that's the only one.

True or false: creative people are weird, kind of wacky and prone to mental illness.

True, definitely true.

Do you watch reality television? As you may or may not know, I like watching real people in ridiculous situations. I draw the line at Fear Factor. Rats in a blender? I don't think so.

While I think it's pretty safe to say that I watch too much TV, I don't much care for the reality TV. I was a bit taken with the first few seasons of The Bachelor / Bachelorette but more in a train wreck sort of way. Sometimes I watch The Apprentice. I liked Raj.

Talk to me about art. What is your favorite time period? If you could own any piece of art from any time period, what would it be?

Art is so important, I can't imagine a world without art. If I had to pick a time, I'd say the 50s through the 80s, which is stretching it, but it's hard to narrow down. I'm not sure I'd like to own a Warhol if I had to pick just one. I like Warhol's quotes a bit better than his art. I'd like a Rothko or an Ed Ruscha.

Who was the inspiration for Ian? I liked his style and found myself almost falling for him!

When I worked at Sotheby's there was an expert there who dressed very much like Ian. He had these fantastic-bizarre-completely-groovy outfits all the time, and I'd love passing him in the halls and seeing what he had on. I didn't know him at all though, so Ian's personality mostly came right out of my thoughts. My somewhat optimistic thoughts.

Will art feature prominently in your next novel? Can you tell me what you are working on?

My next novel is called Pug Hill and it will be out in May. So soon! It's about public speaking and yes, pugs, much more than it is about art. Though my narrator, Hope, works as a Paintings Restorer at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. So the art is still there, but it takes a back seat, pretty far in back. Like if this book were a station wagon, art would be in the way back, but I still wanted it along for the ride.

What do you like to do when you are not writing?

Stress out about what I've just written. Other than that, I do quite like the email, blogs, yoga, going to dinner, movies and plays. I have a wonderful group of friends in NYC, so seeing them takes up a good amount of non-writing time.


3 Comments:

Blogger localcelebrity said...
Im reading "The Philosophy of Andy Warhol" right now. I kind of hated him before, but this book is actually making me like him. He's hilarious!

Im glad you posted this, Ill def check this book out too! @ 11:05 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...
New Novel about "Andrei" Warhol by Alexander J. Motyl

Who Killed Andrei Warhol is an absurdist tragicomedy that imagines a
friendship between pop artist Andy Warhol and a straight-laced Soviet
Ukrainian journalist who arrives in New York at the height of the
garbage strike in early 1968 to cover the impending American Revolution.
As the journalist, Sasha Ivanov, struggles to understand life in New
York, he decides that his fellow Ukrainian worker, "Andrei" Warhol, is a
socialist realist painter, a proletarian genius, and a passionate
Leninist. Ivanov also has an affair with Warhol's would-be assassin,
Valerie Solanas, and gets implicated in intrigues involving the FBI, the
KGB, the Communist Party USA, the Black Panthers, and the Students for a
Democratic Society.

Alexander J. Motyl is a writer, painter, and professor of political
science at Rutgers University-Newark. His first novel was Whiskey
Priest; his art is represented by The Tori Collection.

Who Killed Andrei Warhol may be ordered directly from Seven Locks Press
(www.sevenlockspublishing.com) as well as from Amazon.com and
BarnesandNoble.com.

Advance praise for Who Killed Andrei Warhol:

Askold Melnyczuk, author of Ambassador of the Dead, founder/editor of
AGNI Magazine.

"All fiction is by nature revisionist and Motyl's surprising and
ingenious novel, Who Killed Andrei Warhol, adds several dimensions to
our understanding of this American icon, blazing new avenues of approach
to a subject whose object was cultural depletion."

Dzvinia Orlowsky, author of A Handful of Bees, winner of the Pushcart
Prize for Poetry.

"With wit and great energy, Motyl invites us to reconsider the heroic
forces that shaped Andy Warhol's life and work as witnessed through
Communist comrade Sasha's eyes. After reading this book, I don't think
I'll ever look at a Warhol painting quite the same way."

Gloria Mindock, editor, Cervena Barva Press

"This novel is a riveting 'Warholian' masterpiece. The diary takes the
reader to the emotional inner conflict of Ivanov, who needs to decide
where his loyalty lies. Written with such a sophisticated take on
Ivanov, Alexander J. Motyl proves he is a writer to watch."

Casey Dorman, author of I, Carlos

"Who Killed Andrei Warhol will delight readers with its humor, its
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Eastern and Western outlooks on the world." @ 8:24 AM  
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